Water System Assessment & Rate Study

Water System Assessment - In Progress



Water and sewer payments made by Village of Lisle water customers serve to sustain the operation and maintenance of the water distribution system. To understand more about the condition of the water distribution system, and collect comprehensive data on system components, the Village has engaged an engineering consultant, Baxter and Woodman, to complete a water system needs assessment and water rate analysis. 

Background information on the Water System Needs Assessment & Water Rate Analysis. 

March 2, 2020 Preliminary Water Assessment Presentation

A water system needs assessment consists of an evaluation of the age and condition of water towers, water treatment equipment, water mains, and other system components in an effort to determine the future needs of the system. Information gathered during this process is then used to develop a plan for future capital investment.
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Develop System Inventory

The first step in the Village’s Water System Assessment is to review the Village’s water system inventory. Conducting the inventory process includes data gathering as well as a visual site inspection of pumping stations and storage tanks. Critical information on the water distribution system such as size, pipe type, and age is included.
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  1. Adam Hall


    Assistant Public Works Director
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    Administration & Engineering
    4907 Yackley Ave.
    Lisle, IL 60532
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    Ph: 630-271-4170
    Fax: 630-271-4160

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Water Rate Study 


Once a capital investment plan is developed for the system, revenues are analyzed and recommendations are made for the development of a sustainable financing model that will enable the capital investment plan to be carried out. This work is referred to as conducting a water rate analysis where current water rates, costs of provisioning water, anticipated increases in the cost of wholesale water (from DuPage Water Commission and the City of Chicago), and the revenues generated from the water system operation are taken into account in addition to consumer trends, neighboring water rates, and other factors.
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Prepare Cost of Service


The first step in a rate analysis is to understand the current financial position of the Water Fund. The consultant will create a financial model and observe patterns and trends from previous years such as water consumption, water purchasing, capital expenses and fixed operating costs.